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Agriculture
Economy
Dataset

Carbon in biomass and soil at high elevation forest in Austria

Published by: BFW License: License not specified

We studied the economic performance of a high-elevation protection forest in the Alps, where productivity increases due to climate change and where the timber market for the dominating cembran pine (Pinus cembra) is favorable. We simulated the standing timber stock and the soil carbon pool for a 100-year period with climate-sensitive models and compared harvesting costs with expected revenues. Ourscenarios included different climates, intensities of timber extractions, parameters of the timber market, and the availability of government subsidies. Overall, the productivity of forests increases by approximately 15% until the end of the century. In a zero-management scenario the forest accumulates carbon both in the aboveground biomass and the soil. An extensive management strategy with moderate timber ex tractions every 50 years the carbon stocks in biomass and soil decline. A more intensive management scenario with extractions every 30 years leads to substantial losses of the soil and biomass carbon pools. In addition, the stand structure changes and the protective function of the forest is not sustainably ensured. Only at high prices for cembran pine timber and the availability of governmental subsidies for forest management timber production can be economically successful. The admixed European larch (Larix decidua) contributes only marginally. The main challenge are harvesting costs. The costs of timber extraction by a long-distance cableway logging system exceed the value of the harvested timber. Therefore, the intensification of forest management cannot be recommended from the perspective of timber production, sustainable forest management and protection against natural hazards. Leaving the forest unmanaged does not impose a particular threat to stand stability and is under the encountered situation a justified strategy

Dataset Versions:

This Version

Version 1 Release Date: 2018-04-17 12:00:00

Latest Version

Version 1 Release Date: 2018-04-17 12:00:00

Cite this dataset:

Using this data set or resource, you should cite this data set according to the given copyright conditions with following citation rules:
Jandl et al (2018). Carbon in biomass and soil at high elevation forest in Austria, Version 1. Vienna, Austria. CCCA Data Centre. PID: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11756/0563079a. [December 11, 2018]

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Organization BFW
Metadata Point of Contact (Maintainer): Robert Jandl

Dataset Creator (Author): Robert Jandl

Citation Info Jandl et al

Basic Information about this dataset

Dataset Locator - URI https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11756/0563079a
Abstract We studied the economic performance of a high-elevation protection forest in the Alps, where productivity increases due to climate change and where the timber market for the dominating cembran pine (Pinus cembra) is favorable. We simulated the standing timber stock and the soil carbon pool for a 100-year period with climate-sensitive models and compared harvesting costs with expected revenues. Ourscenarios included different climates, intensities of timber extractions, parameters of the timber market, and the availability of government subsidies. Overall, the productivity of forests increases by approximately 15% until the end of the century. In a zero-management scenario the forest accumulates carbon both in the aboveground biomass and the soil. An extensive management strategy with moderate timber ex tractions every 50 years the carbon stocks in biomass and soil decline. A more intensive management scenario with extractions every 30 years leads to substantial losses of the soil and biomass carbon pools. In addition, the stand structure changes and the protective function of the forest is not sustainably ensured. Only at high prices for cembran pine timber and the availability of governmental subsidies for forest management timber production can be economically successful. The admixed European larch (Larix decidua) contributes only marginally. The main challenge are harvesting costs. The costs of timber extraction by a long-distance cableway logging system exceed the value of the harvested timber. Therefore, the intensification of forest management cannot be recommended from the perspective of timber production, sustainable forest management and protection against natural hazards. Leaving the forest unmanaged does not impose a particular threat to stand stability and is under the encountered situation a justified strategy
Metadata Language English
License notspecified
Visibility public
Use Limitation no limitation
Date of creation (created) April 17, 2018, 12:00 (UTC)
Date of publication (issued) April 17, 2018, 12:00 (UTC)
Date of last modification (modified) April 17, 2018, 12:49 (UTC)
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Starting Date 2018-04-17T14:46:00
Ending Date 2018-04-17T14:46:00
Frequency annual

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